How to make a Distance/ Time Line Graph.

Directions:

1. Set up your graph with "Distance on the "Y" axis and "Time" on the "X" axis.

2. Let's set up the "Y" axis first. Look at the chart below. Begin your graph 0.

Distances (m) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200

Do we need to use a break on the "Y" axis?

3. Now let's set up the "X" axis.

Time (sec) 0 .67 .72 .78 .80 .84 .90 .93 .95 1.00 1.05

Do we need to use a break on the "X" axis?

What should we count by? It is always easiest to count by 2's, 3's, 5's, or 10's

What should the next number be on the "X" axis?

Now your graph should look like this.

Oh No!!!! Look what happened. We can't count by 3's the graph isn't long enough. Let's try 5's instead.

 

4. Now plot each point. Now your graph should look like this.

 

Distances (m) Time (sec)
0
0
20
.67
40
.72
60
.78
80
.80
100
.84
120
.90
140
.93
160
.95
180
1.00
200
1.05

 

5. Finally, draw a line to connect your plotted points. You should use a ruler.

 

 

 

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Physical Science Third Law
 

How to make a Distance/ Time Line Graph.

Directions:

1. Set up your graph with "Distance on the "Y" axis and "Time" on the "X" axis.

2. Let's set up the "Y" axis first. Look at the chart below. Begin your graph 0.

Distances (m) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200

Do we need to use a break on the "Y" axis?

3. Now let's set up the "X" axis.

Time (sec) 0 .67 .72 .78 .80 .84 .90 .93 .95 1.00 1.05

Do we need to use a break on the "X" axis?

What should we count by? It is always easiest to count by 2's, 3's, 5's, or 10's

What should the next number be on the "X" axis?

Now your graph should look like this.

Oh No!!!! Look what happened. We can't count by 3's the graph isn't long enough. Let's try 5's instead.

 

4. Now plot each point. Now your graph should look like this.

 

Distances (m) Time (sec)
0
0
20
.67
40
.72
60
.78
80
.80
100
.84
120
.90
140
.93
160
.95
180
1.00
200
1.05

 

5. Finally, draw a line to connect your plotted points. You should use a ruler.

 

 

 

Go back to Physics Links Page